Moody Monday…… and may be everyday ?

9-Hardknott-Fort--high-on-the-CUMBRIA-FELLS

Hardknott Roman Fort, Cumbria 

I imagine that for the Roman Soldiers stationed here at Hardknott Fort, high on the Cumbrian mountains, it was possibly Moody Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and so on.   The Fort was built at the top of the Hardknott Pass at the head of Eskdale.  An idyllic place on a warm sunny day, but more likely windy, wet and at time worse, vastly different from the Mediterranean climate the Romans were used to.

The pass reaches its summit at about a 1000ft and is surrounded by much higher Cumbrian mountains.  The purpose of the Fort was to guard the Roman Road that ascended from Wrynose Bottom (honest that’s is name), a vital link from the Coast to their network of Forts across Northern England.

They could though look forward to Bath Time, just an 8-mile trek down Eskdale to the port of Ravenglass. Here they had established another Fort named Glannoventa complete with a large Hypocaust Bath House.

For those Roman Soldiers it must have been a bleak location….. for us it can still be moody but also dramatically beautiful

10-Hardknott-Fort--high-on-the-CUMBRIA-FELLS

Please Remember ….

Stay Safe …. Be Kind…. Look After Each Other

5th October

(C) David Oakes 2020

5 thoughts on “Moody Monday…… and may be everyday ?

    • We know the area and the village well. The western edge of the Lake District is much quieter than Central and Eastern Lakes. That lack of visitor numbers make it all the more attractive for those of us who do head in that direction. Eskdale is only a short distant from Lamplugh.

      Liked by 1 person

    • They have a mixed written history. Depending upon which ‘expert’ you read or listen to. Aggressive all conquering, subduing the population or engaging with the locals and encouraging commerce in daily life. What is not disputed is the planning, building and construction skills. Whilst much of what was built is ruins today there is a good deal left and incorporated in todays towns and cities. The biggest legacy is the road network. So well planned it is still used today.

      Liked by 2 people

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