Not yet Autumn……..

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We are now well past the mid point of October…..  but as yet Autumn has yet to bite.

Fly Agaric are starting the autumnal process, always a colourful corner of the woods.

Moving further into the woods,  there is very little to indicate that the seasonal change has started….green is still the dominate colour.

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Dawn this morning didn’t fill us with confidence and the forecast was equally as vague. So the day did swing from blue sky and sunshine to threatening grey… warm sunshine to rain in the near blink of an eye.

Autumn has to arrive sometime, and soon I expect.  I just hope that it want be a fleeting visit.

Whatever the season, whatever the weather, enjoy the weekend ahead… and as always…

Please Remember ….

Stay Safe …. Be Kind…. Look After Each Other

22nd October

(C) David Oakes 2021

A Bit Wet in the Woods….

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Dark and wet in the Oak woods this morning….. and a brisk wind bring leaves from the trees.

I do hope we are not going to move straight to winter, missing out autumn on the way.  At the moment the forward forecast is looking pretty grim.

The weather may be grim but we must still remember to…..

Stay Safe …. Be Kind…. Look After Each Other

19th October

(C) David Oakes 2021

Moody Monday….. High on the Moors

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High on Burbage Moor, Derbyshire

Sometimes sunny, often bleak…some say wild.  But always a treat.

Wherever you are and whatever you have planned for this week….

Please Remember ….

Stay Safe …. Be Kind…. Look After Each Other

18th October

(C) David Oakes 2021

 

Silent Sunday….. Revisiting a Favourite Old Derbyshire Church

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Holy Trinity Church, Ashford in the Water, Derbyshire

Holy Trinity is a typical old English Village Church.  It has stood in the central position of the village since 1205, and as with so many of our old churches, is reputedly built on a much older site of worship. The Tower is one of the oldest parts of the original church still standing.  Square and stout, which it needs tr be as it houses the 7 Cast Iron Church Bells. 

I did say this was one my favourite village churches, perhaps because of it surprisingly spacious, yet intimate and welcoming interior.

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Holy Trinity is one of the few Churches that still display examples of Funeral Crant’s of Maidens Garlands.  Maybe so few exist as they are so fragile.  A wooden hoop decorated with either wild flowers or paper flowers.  Often a Handkerchief  or glove of the ‘maiden’ being remembered were also attached. In Holy Trinity you will find 4 Crant’s hanging  above the north aisle, safe in perspex domes.

Here is a little more information on Crant’s…

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One thing is for sure…. when the 7 Bells in the Tower ring out across the village and surrounding countryside,  no one would miss the call ( not such a Silent Sunday then ) !

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Relaxing on a Sunday or busy planning the week ahead…..

Please Remember ….

Stay Safe …. Be Kind…. Look After Each Other

17th October

(C) David Oakes 2021

 

Thoughtful Thursday…… The Humble Teasel

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In the UK the Teasel is a Wildflower.  Found in hedgerows, field edges, river banks and usually where there is damp ground.

The distinctly prickly seed head grows on top of tall thorn covered stems. In the summer those heads start of green the develop into a furry blue flower.  At this stage it is loved by Bees.  Then once autumn approaches, and into winter, the seed heads become a vital food source for small birds…..  in particular they are loved by the diminutive Finches.  Their benefit for wildlife is why many gardeners allow any self seed Teasels to flourish.

Teasel Seed Heads have also proved their worth in the woolen and cloth mills. Attached to spindles they were used to ‘nap’ the wool strands or cloth, on the loom as it was woven or spun..  These natural tools were far better than any manufactured steel roller.  If a spike caught in the fabric it would break the spike and the teasel replaced.  With the steel roller, when it caught a fibre it could, and more often did, tear the fabric.

Always amazed at how resourceful our forefathers were.

I do understand that in some countries Teasels are considered an invasive specie.  But in the UK I consider them an essential addition for our Wildlife and mixed Habitat…. they decorate many a river or lakeside bank and a vital food source

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As always……..

Please Remember ….

Stay Safe …. Be Kind…. Look After Each Other

14th October

(C) David Oakes 2021